Brick Insights Sets Statistics FAQ

This is the

Ratings distribution chart

1-4
5-8
9-12
13-16
17-20
21-24
25-28
29-32
33-36
37-40
41-44
45-48
49-52
53-56
57-60
61-64
65-68
69-72
73-76
77-80
81-84
85-88
89-92
93-96
97-100

You can see it on each set page.
(Here's an example.)

The ratings distribution chart tells us how the LEGO community generally score sets. This is useful since all communities have their own distribution. The movie community is generally pretty critical, making a score between 75-85 pretty good.

As you can see, the LEGO Community seem to think pretty highly of LEGO sets in general, making a score of 75-85 pretty average.

1-4
5-8
9-12
13-16
17-20
21-24
25-28
29-32
33-36
37-40
41-44
45-48
49-52
53-56
57-60
61-64
65-68
69-72
73-76
77-80
81-84
85-88
89-92
93-96
97-100

See? Here's the average, 79.9

The median is here, at 81

I see. But what about the colors?

When we know the average score and the number of sets, we can calculate something called the standard deviation. This number tells us how many points there are between each score on average. It's currently 10.84. We use this number and say that if a set is within one standard deviation from the average it's an average score. Anything below that is bad, and anything above is good. We represent this with three colors:

Does it seem like a set needs a very high score to be in the green? Does it feel unfair? It's just a byproduct of the general scoring we use, but it certainly enables us to consider: why is that? Does LEGO produce really fantastic sets? Or are we, ahem, rabid fanbois? Regardless - by using the average score and standard deviation we know which sets are truly awesome.

Oh, and to make it even more fun, we can do the same calculation for all sets released in a certain year. You can see the result of that on every set page as well.

The chart used here on Brick Insights is divided by steps of four, giving 25 steps in total. That's a totally arbitrary decision, but I felt it was a good number. It's evenly divisible by 100 and has enough detail to be useful.

I'm not a statistician, but this was a lot of fun to learn. Here's a good article on how to calculate the standard deviation. We're calculating on population, not sample.

Here's the numbers!

1-4 (0 sets, which is 0.00% of all sets)

5-8 (0 sets, which is 0.00% of all sets)

9-12 (0 sets, which is 0.00% of all sets)

13-16 (1 sets, which is 0.01% of all sets)

17-20 (7 sets, which is 0.09% of all sets)

21-24 (4 sets, which is 0.05% of all sets)

25-28 (6 sets, which is 0.08% of all sets)

29-32 (6 sets, which is 0.08% of all sets)

33-36 (12 sets, which is 0.16% of all sets)

37-40 (12 sets, which is 0.16% of all sets)

41-44 (25 sets, which is 0.33% of all sets)

45-48 (24 sets, which is 0.32% of all sets)

49-52 (55 sets, which is 0.73% of all sets)

53-56 (98 sets, which is 1.31% of all sets)

57-60 (165 sets, which is 2.20% of all sets)

61-64 (192 sets, which is 2.56% of all sets)

65-68 (344 sets, which is 4.59% of all sets)

69-72 (533 sets, which is 7.11% of all sets)

73-76 (855 sets, which is 11.41% of all sets)

77-80 (1147 sets, which is 15.31% of all sets)

81-84 (1270 sets, which is 16.95% of all sets)

85-88 (1179 sets, which is 15.73% of all sets)

89-92 (910 sets, which is 12.14% of all sets)

93-96 (466 sets, which is 6.22% of all sets)

97-100 (183 sets, which is 2.44% of all sets)

All of this is calculated automatically from the reviews we have, and is updated

daily

I hope you enjoyed this breakdown and now know how to read the distribution chart better. Cheers!